About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 6
CSPAN2 5
CNNW 3
FBC 3
KPIX (CBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning, again. we start this morning with david keene, who is the president of the national rifle association. friday the n.r.a. made its first public station since the newtown shooting and the reaction from the gun control vacation was scathing, no reaction there. lloyd grove of the "daily beast" summed up the reaction by saying the reviews were so brutal they would close a broadway show on opening night. this was news conference a mistake, mr. keene? >> not at all. and, fortunately, we're not on broadway. this isn't a joke. you know, we remained silent right after newtown because we didn't think it was appropriate to comment at time. but now we've come out and looked at it and the question on everybody's minds we tried address is what do you do to prevent this from happening in the future? you know, it was interesting, bob, because that week i was in israel. and they had a spate of school shootings in the 70s and they decided they needed to have security at
. >> despite bipartisan support and a dramatic appearance on the senate floor by former leader bob dole, just out of the hospital. >> more than a dear friend, bob remains an authentic hero to millions of his countrymen, someone whose personal example of war time sacrifice was equal, if suf a thing is possible, by his service in this body and is respected wherever people value political courage and civility. >> in the nearly 30 years that i've been here, i think this is the first time i've seen a former majority leader of the united states senate come to the senate floor for a vote and certainly the first time that i've seen it happen when he had every right to be at home at age 89 taking care of his health. but that's not bob dole. this is about people. this treaty helps thousands of vets, men and women, who paid the price of devotion to our country with their limbs. >> president obama just now on bloomberg tv on why he hasn't sat down with the speaker to hammer out a budget deal. >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. you know, he talks, for example, abou
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
." >> thank you, bob. >> schieffer: we'll be back in one minute. ,,,,,, ,,,,,, >> schieffer: and back now with our political roundtable. mike allen, the chief white house correspondent for politico. margaret brennan, our state department correspondent. and our chief white house correspondent, major garrett. so, gentlemen, isn't it a shame we don't have anything really to talk about? nothing much-- >> what a slow news week. >> schieffer: yeah, slow news week here as we head into christmas. mike, i have to ask you, what about this ben affleck for the senate? do you think he might do that? >> i don't upon i think there's a reason senator al franken is one of the few celebrities that actually get into congress but your conversation with him made it clear someone else who wanted to be talked about is ted kennedy jr. cthe senator's son, who we are told will announce today or tomorrow whether or not he'll go for senator kerr's seat. >> schieffer: do you think if he doesn't decide to seek that senate seat, do you think he'll try for something else? >> i think so bob. it's a little awkward for him
: paying last bit of income. >> right. melissa: bob what do you think about this? >> well, i think the bigger issue higher tax rates slow down the economy and in a slow economy as we're facing now to be raising rates even higher, i can't imagine any economist really supporting that, regardless what is going on the fiscal side. melissa: you're sing this is the entire wrong conversation to be having anyway, talking about taking more money away from individuals and giving it to the govnment is not good for the economy no matter what? >> exactly. particularly when the economy is weak. even keynesian economists will tell you that is not the rightime to raise taxes. >> i don't think so. we have a lot of kensyians are saying there is no demand. government has to make up for the demand that doesn't ext from consumers. that means you have to give them money to go out there and spend, no? >> they wld say you spend but noo say tax at the same time. they would say that will counteract whatever spending you do, the tax increases. i think what you need to do is actually cut spending. at a minimu
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
that was never supposed to become public. bob woodward of "the washington pos post", you'll find in that name familiar new york doubt, in the spring of 2011 an analyst with fox news delivered a personal message from her boss, the conservative media mogul roger ales to general david patreaus. i'm joined by jim acosta from washington. what was the message that that reporter delivered in afghanistan? >> reporter: well, the message from that analyst at fox to patreaus was roger ailes a high-level executive at fox wanted the general to run for president and just listen to some of the audio. it features k.t. mcfarland a national security analyst at fox news and of course general david patreaus, this conversation was had back in 2011. just before he was named to run the cia. i'm being told we don't have that audio ready to go. let me read to you a little bit of what was said during that conversation as reported by "the washington post." one point, mcfarland says, quote, the other thing was just directly advised to me from roger ailes and patreaus says i'm not running. we do have a little bit of the
and bob dole and danny, they served next to ordinary people with 8th grade and high school educations. for me, all of the things that have been said about warren i could repeat and it would emphasize what you already know about them. the reason why i martin so much is the reason i just stated -- the reason why i admired him so much is the reason i just stated. i never met a man in all of the time i have served with the single exception of daniel inouye who had the grit -- in ordinary americans. the thing i like best from warren is when he said, just tell them the truth. that is what he always did. he told the truth. we all have a slightly different perspective, his honesty could be searing, but his compassion was always profound. that is a rare combination for any man or woman. he believed that the coolest lives are often told in silence. he would come up to you and say, i was flat wrong. let me conclude by saying that one of the tests in all of my years is that for warren rudman, he said the client of the realm is your integrity, and it is. -- there is a coin of the realm that is you
that could be used to make the deadly gas sarin. bob bear, i'll bring you in, cnn contributor, former cia officer. welcome back. before we talk about the specifics of sarin, let me just throw this at you. is it possible at all that this man, this mad man, bashar al assad, is bluffing? >> oh, i don't think he's bluffing. we have to consider what he represents and that's a very small community, which feels under threat. it thinks it will be destroyed by sunni fundamentalists if it loses damascus or any other big cities. they have their backs to the wall. they say among themselves that when it comes to their lives or killing the rebels they will kill the rebels. in other words, yes, they will use the sarin, i've been dealing with the people for 30 years, they're almost a cult. what seems to us completely irrational decision, they're capable of. i don't know whether they have reached this point or not, but if things get bad enough in syria, i have no dowd they'll use it. >> on this sarin gas, i was reading about it, apparently there are two key components that make this gas and they're held s
of democracies. this is just over one hour. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are unavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence- squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that spread to egypt and the egyptian revolution was concern to the united states. egypt has long held incredible importance to u.s. policy in the middle east. the u.s. reaction to that revolution was unclear. there were some that said this was a good thing that this would only lead to democracy. there
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
the fact that there was such a great working relationship with the uaw and have you talked to bob king on your show? >> eliot: no. >> he will tell you that the uaw are obsessed with quality and they would be the ones who are able to identify where the chinks in armor are and they recognize that it's not just the management against labor any more but that it is american companies versus the rest of the world, and they want those jobs in america. they're going to find ways to make those businesses competitive here. >> eliot: i got to tell you in the conversation i've had, i don't think i ever heard anyone say we want you to be a right to work state. they wanted skills, an educated workforce. they wanted the environment to be able to get the people they wanted. those were the issues that mattered. if you look at the date tax i'm not persuaded--i'm persuaded contrary to what the right to work advocates say that it does not increase jobs. >> what they do is increase wages which increases demand and the purchasing power of people who are purchasing products that they will manufacture. it is
who have said they're going back on the pledge, lindsey graham, bob corker, tom coburn, lamar alexander, eric cantor, what do you do at this point to keep the fight going? or do you think that it is necessary to concede a little bit of ground? >> well, two things. the senators, the republican senators to a certain extent don't matter because the democratic senate can pass a tax increase if they want the senaaors you mentioned would only vote for a tax increase if they got massive permanent entitlement reforms of the kind that harry reid and the president have announced they're not doing. so even if coburn broke his commitment to the people of oklahoma, which he got a elected with a written commitment not to raise taxes at all, his new statement is, he might raise tax as little if he got permanent reform. melissa: do you ffle the tide is turning against you and necessary to give in a little bit to get a deal done or not? >> okay. there is no need to raise taxes to get a deal. obama two years ago extended all the bush tax cuts for two years. there is no reason not to do that aga
. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cory booker. the sunday network tv shows are repairing here on c-span at noon -- here on cspan radio. listen to them all on cspan radio on 90.1 fm in the washington, d.c. area and nationwide on siriusxm radio. [video clip] >> the staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that to cocker the land would cost 700,000 man and 500,000 of them would be maimed for life. >> i choose to honor both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and a little girl like sadako who died as a result of the atomic bomb. it is unimaginable with the most of them like to be close to that we're that far ball or originated and the blast was strongest. >> follow the journey th
in 2011. according to a recorded conversation obtained by washington post reporter and author bob woodward. >> i'm not running. >> reporter: making the pitch is katie mcfarland. she tells the general that ailes was willing to give up his job at the network to run a pate pa try use campaign. >> reporter: that big boss, she says, was rupert murdoch, head of fox news parent company news corp ration. but petraeus repeatedly shoots down the idea. after he later accepted the job at the cia, mcfarland went on fox to talk about her conversation with the general, but never mentioned the ailes' offer. >> i think that he doesn't want to run. i asked him that question and he said i'm not running for president. >> reporter: ailes said he did ask mcfarland to approach petraeus, but added -- >> cnn media critic howard kirk says one part of the pitch is because in. >> the idea that rupert murdoch would bankroll it is not that far-fetched. >> reporter: murdoch repeatedly injected himself in the race, saying mitt romney last week, tough chicago pros will be hard to beat unless he drops old friends from team
there is duplication. there are clearly areas where we can provide greater efficiencies. we were able, bob gates before me begin that effort. we have added about $60 billion on top of that in terms of further efficiencies. we will continue to review where greater efficiencies can be achieved. i ask that question when i first became secretary. what is the role of the service secretary visa be the service chief? the reality is that there is an important role for them. they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. the also have to negotiate a lot of the politics. so there is an important role for them to play in terms of their particular service. having said that, there are a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon and we will. >> at the defense department deals with downsizing services, have you considered cuts to the number of flight in general officers? >> i think that is part and parcel. as you do force reduction, we will be reducing the structure and i think as that happens, they have to review not just the reductions in our troops but also th
to the top republicans since 1986, serving republican leader bob michael, newt gingrich, speaker hastert and john boehner and floor assistant as the general clerk for republican leader john rose and assist ant manager for the republican cloakroom. his experience has been invaluable to all of us who serve here in the house of representatives. jay is known for his vast knowledge of the rules, for his vast knowledge of the traditions and history and the procedures of the house of representatives. and he has been a teacher and a coach to so many members of the congress over the years and we're grateful to his dedication and that he has given this institution over the past 34 years. jay was born in santa barbara, california and graduated from westmont college. jay has a master's degree and pd in english literature. he and his wife have two grown sons, joel and jay. jay is a man of faith and he has his party in the right place. several years ago, he said politics must be secondary to faith and to life. ultimate answers don't lie in politic. no matter what we do or legislate, we won't solve the
morning. >> host: good morning, bob. >> caller: question. this is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. the interest-rate cut the interest that is paid on the national debt. presently most of our debt is under short term, under 1%. and it's manipulated, of course, by the federal reserve and treasury department. so it's going to go from say 250 billion interest payments up to 7%, the next several years. one half trillion dollars in interest annually on the national debt. wondering, how is that going to impact our military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? >> that clearly -- the ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government and probably because of. [indiscernible] , the state government. we are in a time of unusually low interest rates. it will continue for a time, but when they rise it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country because, as your caller was indicating, the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is, can you say greece? >> host: what does it mean for th
efficiency. so we were able, bob teets before me begin that effort, achieved about $150 billion in savings. we've added about 60 to 70 billion on top of that in terms of further efficiencies. we'll continue to reveal for greater efficiencies can be achieved. right now i ask that question when i first became secretary. you know, what is the role of the service secretary vis-À-vis the service chief? the reality is there is an important role for them because they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. they also have to negotiate a lot of the politics of capitol hill. so there's an important role for them to play in terms of a particular service. having said that, there are a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon and we will. >> as the defense department does the downsizing services committee consider cuts to the number flag and general officers? >> again, i think that's part and parcel as he do force reduction. as i said, we are going to be reducing the force structure in the army to 490,000. the reduced the marines as well and i
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)